What is a healthy blood glucose level?

Utilization of food by the body

The Body’s Fuel Sources
Commercially, fructose is derived from sugar cane , sugar beets , and maize. Infectious disease and nutrition blood composition In blood: These foods should not be eaten in excessive amounts and need to be properly balanced with raw leafy green vegetables. Lactose, or milk sugar, consists of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of galactose. This does not mean that there aren't times when more nuts are required, as when recovering from a fast and when calorie intake is low, as previously mentioned. Fructose exists in foods either as a monosaccharide free fructose or as a unit of a disaccharide sucrose.

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Human nutrition

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Fuel Metabolism and Endurance Exercise Carbohydrate, protein, and fat each play distinct roles in fueling exercise. Carbohydrate is increasingly vital during high-intensity exercise when the body cannot process enough oxygen to meet its needs. Keeps the brain and nervous system functioning—When blood glucose runs low, you become irritable, disoriented, and lethargic, and you may be incapable of concentrating or performing even simple tasks.

Aids the metabolism of fat—To burn fat effectively, your body must break down a certain amount of carbohydrate. Dietary protein is much better utilized to build, maintain, and repair body tissues, as well as to synthesize hormones, enzymes, and neurotransmitters. Fat Provides a concentrated source of energy—Fat provides more than twice the potential energy that protein and carbohydrate do 9 calories per gram of fat versus 4 calories per gram of carbohydrate or protein.

Helps fuel low- to moderate-intensity activity—At rest and during exercise performed at or below 65 percent of aerobic capacity, fat contributes 50 percent or more of the fuel that muscles need. Their building blocks are nitrogen-containing molecules called amino acids.

If your cells have all 20 amino acids available in ample amounts, you can make an infinite number of proteins. Nine of those 20 amino acids are essential, meaning you must get them in the diet. Bodybuilders drink protein shakes for breakfast and after working out. Dieters with no time to stop for lunch grab protein bars.

Are these strategies necessary for optimal strength building and weight loss? Proteins in the body are constantly broken down and re-synthesized. Our bodies reuse most of the released amino acids, but a small portion is lost and must be replaced in the diet.

The requirement for protein reflects this lost amount of amino acids plus any increased needs from growth or illness.

Because of their rapid growth, infants have the highest RDA for protein at 1. The RDA gradually decreases until adulthood. It increases again during pregnancy and lactation to a level of 1.

The RDA for an adult weighing pounds The RDA remains the same regardless of physical activity level. There is some data, however, suggesting that both endurance and strength athletes have increased protein needs compared to inactive individuals. Endurance athletes may need as much as 1. For an adult consuming kcals per day, the acceptable protein intake ranges from grams per day, an amount easily met. Consider the pound bodybuilder whose protein needs are approximately grams per day.

With his energy needs so great, however, his diet will need careful planning. If he requires engineered foods such as bars and shakes, it will most likely be to meet his energy needs rather than his protein needs. One population that needs special attention is the elderly. Though the RDA for older adults remains the same as for younger adults, some research suggests their needs may be 1. Helping them meet their nutritional needs may take a little creativity and perseverance. People become vegetarian for a variety of reasons including religious beliefs, health concerns, and a concern for animals or for the environment.

Yes, in the typical American diet, most of our protein comes from animal foods. It is possible, however, to meet all of your protein needs while consuming a vegetarian diet.

You can even eat adequate protein on a carefully planned vegan diet - a diet that excludes all animal products, including eggs and dairy. When you think of protein, like most people, you probably think of beef, chicken, turkey, fish and dairy products. Beans and nuts might come to mind as well. Most foods contain at least a little protein, so by eating a diet with variety, vegetarians and vegans can eat all the protein they need without special supplements.

This list illustrates the amount of protein found in common foods that may be included in your diet. A complete protein includes all of the essential amino acids. Complete proteins include all animal proteins and soy. Incomplete proteins lack one or more essential amino acids. Beans, nuts, grains and vegetables are incomplete proteins. Previously, registered dietitians and physicians advised vegetarians to combine foods that contained incomplete proteins at the same meal to give the body all the necessary amino acids it needed at one time.

Today we know this is unnecessary. Your body combines complementary or incomplete proteins that are eaten in the same day. If you eat a variety of foods, you will meet your protein needs. Recreational athletes rarely need protein supplements. Doctors, nutritionists and public health officials told us to stop eating so much fat.

Cut back on fat, they said, to lose weight and fend off heart disease among other ills. Rather, low-fat food labels seduced us, and we made pretzels and fat-free, sugar-rich desserts our grocery staples. Today we know to focus on the quality of the fat instead of simply the quantity. Say NO to very low-fat diets. Many people find them limiting, boring, tasteless and hard to stick to. And because fat tends to slow down digestion, many low-fat dieters fight hunger pangs all day or eat such an abundance of low-fat foods that their calorie intake is too great for weight loss.

Dietary fat has critical roles in the body. This caloric density is a lifesaver when food is scarce and is important for anyone unable to consume large amounts of food. The elderly, the sick and others with very poor appetites benefit from high-fat foods. Fats and oils collectively known as lipids contain mixtures of fatty acids.

You may refer to olive oil as a monounsaturated fat. Really, however, olive oil contains a combination of monounsaturated, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, but it has more monounsaturated fatty acids than other types. Similarly, it is technically incorrect to call lard a saturated fat.

It does contain mostly saturated fatty acids, but both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids are present as well. Depending on the age, the AI for infants is 30 or 31 grams of fat per day. For an adult consuming kcals then, the acceptable fat intake ranges from 35 to 62 grams daily. Experts discourage low-fat diets for infants, toddlers and young children because fat is energy-dense, making it appropriate for small, finicky appetites and to support growth and the developing central nervous system.

Because your body can make all the saturated fatty acids it needs, you do not need any in the diet. High intakes of most saturated fatty acids are linked to high levels of LDL low-density lipoprotein , or bad, cholesterol and reduced insulin sensitivity.

If you tried to eat no saturated fatty acids, however, you would soon find that you had little to eat. Remember that fats are combinations of fatty acids, so even nuts and salmon good sources of healthy fats contain some saturated fatty acids. What does bacon grease look like after the pan has cooled? Its firmness is a hint that bacon is high in saturated fat. Many saturated fats are solid at room temperature. Dairy fat and the tropical oils coconut, palm and palm kernel are also largely saturated.

The greatest sources of saturated fat in the American diet are full-fat cheese, pizza and desserts. The benefit you experience from reducing your intake of saturated fats depends on many factors, including what you replace them with. Loading up on fat-free pretzels and gummy candies may be tempting, but is a misguided strategy because diets high in heavily refined carbohydrates typically increase triglycerides and lower the beneficial HDL high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, both risk factors for heart disease.

A better strategy is to replace the foods rich in unhealthy fats with foods rich in healthy fats. Cooking with oils is better than cooking with butter or lard. A quick lunch of a peanut butter sandwich instead of a slice of pizza will do your heart some good. Trading out some of the cheese on your sandwich for a slice or two of avocado is another smart move. Food manufacturers create both saturated and trans fats when they harden oil in a process called hydrogenation, usually to increase the shelf life of processed foods like crackers, chips and cookies.

Partial hydrogenation converts some, but not all, unsaturated fatty acids to saturated ones. Others remain unsaturated but are changed in chemical structure. These are the health-damaging trans fats. They also lower HDL cholesterol the good cholesterol. Achieving this might be trickier than you realize because many foods touting No Trans Fats on their labels actually contain traces of these artery-scarring fats. If you eat a few servings of foods with smidgens of trans fat like margarine crackers and baked goods, you can easily exceed the recommended limit.

Identify traces of trans fats by reading the ingredients lists on food labels. Partially hydrogenated oil is code for trans fat. You know that there are at least traces of trans fat present. When oil is fully hydrogenated the label will say hydrogenated or fully hydrogenated , it will not contain trans fats.

Instead, the unsaturated fatty acids have been converted to saturated fatty acids. As discussed, unsaturated fatty acids improve blood cholesterol levels and insulin sensitivity when they replace saturated and trans fats.

There are two classes of unsaturated fatty acids: Monounsaturated fat souces include avocados, nuts, seeds and olives. Peanut, canola and olive oils are additional sources.

When you work on reducing whole-milk dairy, solid fats like butter and bacon grease , and processed foods containing partially hydrogenated oils, be sure to replace them with unsaturated fats rather than simply adding extra calories to your usual diet.

Protein intake