Principles of Ecology (Powerpoint Slides) – Chapter 2

The Digestive and Endocrine System Game

Nutrition Resources
This course provides a brief overview of the field of ethics, computer privacy and security, computer crime and software piracy, intellectual property and information ownership, computers and gender, computers and social justice, and civil liberties in cyberspace. Students study database concepts and the Access environment and learn how to design and create databases. Their kidneys extract nitrogenous wastes from the bloodstream, but instead of excreting it as urea dissolved in urine as we do, they excrete it in the form of uric acid. This course covers advanced accounting topics in financial accounting such as: Note larger size of crop in omnivore and herbivores, and particularly in hoatzin. Click on the arrows to scroll through each Module. Students discover how Jewish music developed in different circumstances and ultimately examine how the music of the Orthodox community became what it is today.

Admissions

Questions & Answers A-Z

Also covered in this course are tax periods and accounting methods with major emphasis on working with tax laws, tax rules and procedures for the tax practitioner, and the tax research processes. This class covers the creation, formation, and liquidation of C corporations as well as tax practices and ethics as they relate to C corporations. This course will cover tax issues for flow-through entities such as Subchapter S corporations, partnerships, Limited Liability Companies, trusts and estates.

Also addressed will be estate and gift taxes, tax planning issues, tax practice and ethics. Sources and applications of federal tax law are also covered. The course also emphasizes tax research processes including appropriate communication.

This course covers tax issues relating to investments, charitable giving, estate planning, business succession planning, ethics, and cross-border tax considerations. Sources and application of federal tax law are also covered. The course emphasizes tax research processes including appropriate communication. The course covers auditing techniques and procedures as prescribed by the Auditing Standards Board and the Public Accounting Oversight Board.

The course also covers professional ethics, legal liability of the auditor and the impact of the PCAOB on the development of professional standards. Students will apply their understanding of the audit function as required by the PCOAB through research and presentations. This course is designed to look at topics beyond those covered in basic auditing classes.

Students study in-depth current standards of practice in areas such as fraud detection, internal and EDP auditing, and specialized attestation engagements. Also emphasizes the ethical, legal, and regulatory environment of auditing and theoretical issues. Focus is placed on security and control issues from an accounting and auditing perspective along with the related technology issues and the impact on business cycles. The processing of accounting data and the controls necessary to assure accuracy and reliability of data by a responsive accounting system are also emphasized.

Technology issues used by auditors and forensic accountants and highlighted by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants i. This course covers governmental accounting and the various funds associated with non-profit enterprises including a study of accounting techniques as applied to federal and state governmental units, public school systems, colleges and universities, hospitals, voluntary and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations.

This course covers special topics of financial accounting, auditing, tax, or managerial accounting. The specific topic s offered will be listed in the course schedules for the session during which the seminar is offered.

This class is offered in a seminar format, focusing on discussion rather than lecture. This course provides an opportunity for students to expand their learning by gaining experience in the workplace. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with, and should be approved and sponsored by a full-time College of Business Accounting faculty member and the work supervisor of the intern prior to the start of the internship. This course will cover the underlying issues and concerns faced by adult learners.

AEDU will also help students gain a better understanding of how continuing education and training leads to improved performance in the classroom and the workplace. Admission into an undergraduate cohort degree program.

This seminar prepares the learner for success in a cohort program. The foundation for adult learning in a cohort model is established, including professional skill development through practical experience with the University's four essential learning outcomes - communication, problem solving, collaboration and citizenship. Learner strengths will be assessed and analytical, relational, and resilience skills will be developed. Several competencies are developed through problem-based applications that include critical thinking, innovation, digital literacy, information literacy, teamwork, professionalism, writing, speaking, and ethical discernment.

This course examines adult learning theory as it applies to factors that influence and facilitate adult participation and learning. This course also explores how differences influence learning, motivation, and curriculum development.

In this course, students will examine research related to learning styles and implications for curriculum and instruction. Students will gain insights to their own learning styles and will develop an understanding of various learning styles and how they relate to their own teaching style.

This course will provide educators with concepts and tools to work with a variety of student learning styles.

It will help them expand their repertoires and create inclusive learning environments for their students. This course challenges students to become more aware of their thought processes, helps them develop those processes, and helps them hone the skills necessary to engage in critical thinking behavior. Students will gain knowledge regarding their own critical thinking capabilities, as well as develop skills to help their constituents engage in critical thinking.

This course will provide an overview of delivery and facilitation skills necessary when working with small and large groups. Looks at how to develop and deliver successful learning outcomes and presentations utilizing various methods and approaches. This course will provide an overview of the most recent technologies that are available to design and deliver effective learning programs for adults.

It explores the benefits and limitations of various online learning techniques utilizing different online teaching instruction, and helps students determine the most appropriate applications for their forum.

In this course, students will discover more about the evaluation process. They will engage in developing learning outcomes, objectives, and will develop processes to assess and evaluate their curriculum to determine if learning objectives and outcomes have been reached.

This course focuses on assessing and improving teacher performance through instructional and non-instructional methods, utilizing active learning techniques, and engaging students both in class and online. In this course, students will learn how to apply the instructional design process and will integrate their ideas to develop instructional design strategies to create their own instructional methods and materials.

They will also examine ways in which to assess student learning and their instructional strategies. At the completion of AEDU and students will have created or revamped a training or instructional program or course utilizing the process and strategies they have learned. This course surveys the major developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture since , including Early and High Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe; Baroque; Rococo; 19th century Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism; and early 21st century.

This course is a comprehensive survey of design elements and principles. It introduces students to critical analysis of artworks, themes, and purposes of art. This course examines two- and three-dimensional media and notable artwork and people in the history of art. This course introduces the media and techniques of drawing, and explores the concept of composition. This course is an overview of arts organizations and their management processes.

Trends, leadership fundamentals, and career opportunities are highlighted. It covers a variety of topics including self-expression, creativity, color theory, art criticism, and utilization of basic painting materials. This course is a general study of three-dimensional composition through sculpture.

Course topics include self-expression, creativity, art criticism, and manipulation of three-dimensional materials. This course explores ceramic materials in basic hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques, emphasizing development of shape and surface treatments. This course introduces students to the basic principles and techniques of the digital photographic medium.

This course is a study of visual art in ancient Egypt, with emphasis on architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts. It examines why the ancient Egyptians invested such wealth and effort in the production of art and ways in which social, religious, and historical changes relate to change in that art.

This course introduces the art of the Italian Renaissance from the early 14th century to the early 16th century. It includes painting, sculpture, and architecture of the early, high, and late Renaissance, also known as Mannerism. Students are also exposed to historical, political, and cultural events that influenced the art and artists of this period.

This course introduces the career-minded art student to such professional practices as marketing, pricing, client and agency relations, and the realities of operating a studio in a given specialty market. Art-related job opportunities, the set up and operation of a business, and financial and legal principles that apply to operating a business are discussed. Student evaluate and determine appropriate goals of individuals relative to their life cycle and acquire knowledge of key financial concepts and related products that can be applied to optimize personal financial wellbeing.

Specific elements of the course include goal making, financial record keeping, and managing decisions associated with credit, taxation, insurance, investments, and estate management. This course focuses on key concepts necessary for personal financial well-being. The course empowers students with fundamental personal financial decision-making skills. Topics researched and discussed include financial self-discipline and behaviors, personal risk management, short and long term goals, and investing alternatives.

The course focuses on knowledge, tools, and skills for cash flow management and for protecting and accumulating financial resources.

In this course, students independently research, review and report on the history, role and nature of a financial intermediary industry such as the banking industry or the credit union industry. Learners review the development of a specific financial intermediary industry and characteristics which distinguish the industry and other financial intermediaries.

Learners research and report on environmental factors and key regulations impacting industry chosen. Students prepare a research report addressing the history, role and nature of their selected financial intermediary industry as well as the specific characteristics, opportunities and challenges most relevant to their individual careers.

This course is designed for College of Business students who have basic file management and office software skills. Course projects are designed for business problem solving and include document management, using spreadsheets for information processing, design and management of personal databases for automated data management, presentation, and integrating business communications.

Recommend prior computer knowledge. This course introduces business and non-business students to entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process and explores its significance in the competitive global economy.

Students examine the characteristics of an entrepreneur and the skills necessary to identify opportunities in the marketplace. Students also explore creativity and innovation as key components driving success not only in new ventures, but also in existing organizations. Other topics include forms of business ownership and the importance of a business plan in directing a new company and attracting investors.

This course examines the fundamental concepts, theories, principles, and techniques of management by integrating classical and modern perspectives with real-world experiences. Students are introduced to both traditional and contemporary views along the management function of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of marketing. It covers the current marketing concepts and practical applications that will include the functions of product, price, place, promotion, and positioning.

Additional emphasis will be given to multicultural and global marketing in the United States and internationally. This course covers the basic principles, techniques, and institutional aspects of financial management in order to provide students applications of finance content similar to those encountered in a finance career. Topics include financial markets and environment, time value of money, bond and stock valuation, risk and return, financial statement ratio analysis, capital budgeting, financial planning and control, capital structure, dividend policy, and other fundamental finance issues.

This course introduces quantitative models appropriate for business applications. Emphasis is on analytical thinking, applied business decision-making, and practical real-life problem solving.

The course starts with an introduction to models and mathematical model building. Specific models and applications include: Software will be applied, as appropriate, in solving large-scale problems. This course examines the roles and functions of human resources management within modern business organizations. It describes, analyzes, and assesses human resources roles in operations and strategies.

Fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance are addressed with an applied focus on risk management processes, rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry.

Topics include fundamental principles of risk management, such as risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Additionally, personal, business, and public policy perspectives concerning life, health, property, and liability risk management and insurance are addressed.

This course builds upon the introductory finance course. It addresses advanced applications and analysis of financial theory and practice. Aspects of the following topics are addressed: The course is designed to mimic experiences and applications found in certain finance careers.

Students will study investment principles and practices in the context of individuals or organizations operating in well-developed financial markets. The course will integrate accepted economic relationships and practices to provide learners with an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that constitute the investment environment. Students will have an opportunity to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments including: This course will focus on international financial tools, applications and concepts.

Topics covered include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations. The course will cover many essential elements of transacting in an international market place. The course addresses the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks.

This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision making and planning. Emphasis is on understanding the mechanics of various models and their applications to business. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through use of software.

This course will examine the operations component of the organization. Computer software is used to generate answers for further analysis. BA A or BA This course is designed to encourage the application of diverse conceptual and theoretical perspectives to the analysis and control of behavior in organizations. The course will focus on problems related to perception, motivation, leadership, cultural diversity, interpersonal and group conflict, stress, influence, decision-making, work family balance, ethics, international management issues, and change.

This course examines how the design and context of organizations influence the functions within them. It will cover the historical background and methodologies for studying organization characteristics and environmental conditions that impact the formation, growth, survival and decline of organizations. Career implications of these topics are also explored. This course examines the roles of compensation and performance- management theory and practice in competitive firms.

This includes detailed examination of the relationships of job analyses, job evaluation, market comparisons, and law to compensation and performance-management policies, systems, and practices. This course examines the approaches and systems that firms use in international and global businesses operations.

This includes the examination of international trade theory, tariffs and regulations systems, financial exchange systems, political and legal systems, and cultural value systems. BA and BA This course describes, analyzes, and evaluates legal foundations, cases, and applications of human resource law.

Areas of law covered will include equal employment opportunity law, labor relations law, fair employment practices law, and compensation-benefits law. Human resource management practices will be considered within analysis and evaluation of laws, cases, and settlements. External factors include competitive analysis, customer trends, political, legal and technological factors. Internal factors include analysis and evaluation of current business strategies, organizational systems, resource deployment, and culture.

The course culminates the undergraduate business program with the capstone project. This course is designed for students who desire to understand and master the intricacies associated with the recruitment and selection of human resources and practices, validity and reliability in testing, legal and regulatory factors affecting selection practices, making employment offers, and practices to ensure equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. This course examines the fundamental concepts, theories, principles and practices of ethics in management by integrating classical and modern perspectives with real world experiences.

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary ethical views along with opportunities for practical application. Ethical domains such as utilitarianism, Kantianism, feminist ethics, subjective ethics and corporate ethical practices will be discussed. This course examines the nature, characteristics, and culture of the online environment to understand, develop, and implement marketing strategies and tactics for conducting effective online commerce.

This course is to introduce International Consumer Behavior, with emphasis on developing a customer focus and competitive advantage by using consumer behavior analysis. The goal is to understand what effects stemming from internal and external influences affect the consumer decision making process in the global economy. This course examines development, structure, and implementation of an effective and profitable sales force across substantially different environmental conditions.

Strategies involving various markets, sales person characteristics, sales program design, and quantitative measurements are emphasized. This course provides a framework for defining brand equity and identifying sources and outcomes of brand equity along with developing a tactical guideline for building, measuring, and managing brand equity.

Emphasis is on building a common denominator to interpret the potential effects and trade-offs of various strategies and tactics for brands. Managing brand equity between what happened to the brand in the past and what should happen to it in the future is explored. Students gain career experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit.

This course examines and explores laws relevant to business activity. Study will focus on areas of law developed specifically for business and business relationships. This course examines basic international laws with the goal of helping students understand the structure within which states, organizations, and individuals function in a global environment.

The international framework will be analyzed and contrasted with the framework governing domestic relationships. Customs and norms will be explored, along with ethical and moral concerns, issues in human rights, environmental considerations, and social responsibility considerations. The learning objectives and specific program of study must be developed in consultation with the College of Business. The internship application must be approved in advance of registering for the course.

Contact the College of Business office for details. This courses includes fundamental principles and practices of risk management and insurance with an applied focus on risk management processes rather than institutional and contractual details of the insurance industry. Topics include risk identification; risk characterization; pricing of risk reduction techniques; risk retention; regulatory, legal and tax implications; insurance; and other hedging strategies. Investment principles and practices are studied in the context of individuals and organizations.

The course will integrate economic relationships and practices for an understanding of the current investment environment. Additionally, the course will survey the institutions and securities that make up the investment environment to provide students a history of how Wall Street operates.

Students should learn to understand and experience how individuals trade financial instruments, including stocks, options, bonds, futures, and other derivative securities.

This course will focus on international financial tools, applications, and concepts. Topics include fundamental international financial relationships and their application to firms and individuals, international transactions, tax issues, and multinational corporations.

It will cover essential elements of transacting in an international market place. It also will address the fundamental risks inherent in international business and the use of financial securities to hedge these risks. Cash management also may be known as treasury management, working capital management, or short-term financial management, This course addresses fundamental principles and practices concerning cash management.

Topics include the role of cash management, credit, accounts receivable and collection management, accounts payable and disbursement management, electronic commerce, information and technology needs for cash management, relevant relationship management, and contemporary issues.

This course introduces modeling as a tool for decision-making and planning. It provides the foundation to understand various analytical models and prepares students to apply them to manage and solve real-life business problems. Large-scale problem solving is facilitated through software applications.

This course surveys international and global business issues, processes, and strategies. Areas of law covered will include, but are not limited to, equal employment opportunity law, labor relations law, fair employment practices law, and compensation-benefits law. Prerequisites for MBA program: MSM , , , , , and This course provides a review of the classical areas of perceptions, cognition, attitudinal formation, and cultural influences that affect individual and group purchasing behaviors.

Emphasis is placed on understanding marketplace dynamics, market segmentation, and understanding the importance of psychographics in market planning analysis. Students gain experience by creating brand strategies and developing a strategic brand audit. Areas of potential study include, but are not limited to: This course will facilitate competency in research and planning methods by conducting an analysis of a topic germane to a particular interest in an Information Technology subject.

The methodology for research and planning will be explored and utilized to develop a proposal for the Capstone Project. This course is designed to improve the application of business intelligence within the corporate structure. It will focus on key themes in the nature of business intelligence to include system architecture, databases, data warehouses, performance management, methodologies, and other related topics. The course will examine emerging efforts to use business intelligence to improve decision-making, enhance strategic position, and sustain competitive advantage.

The course will cover world-class organizations, the guerrilla view of competitive advantage, online communities, data mining, real options theory, and several others. It will introduce the concepts of strategic management such as competitive advantage, Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats SWOT analysis , corporate growth, and strategy implementation. The course will include several case studies that will allow the student to better evaluate the importance of how strategic management integrates in the technology industry.

This course will provide insights and knowledge needed to formulate and understand information systems IS decisions. The course will clarify and elaborate how information technology IT relates to organizational design and business strategy. It will review ethical standards as these relate to IS today. This is an introductory course designed to provide a basic understanding of the benefits, functions and impact of the Business Analyst.

The course will place a special focus on the business analysis function as it relates to developing information technology solutions, given that such an understanding is essential for project success.

The course will identify techniques for ensuring project success every step of the way - from identifying and analyzing potential projects, to making sure the final project product meets the requirements identified.

This course will outline the roles and responsibilities of the business analyst and the process for analyzing business systems, including how to determine a business system's health. The course will identify skills and techniques to translate customer needs into project requirements that provide a framework for identifying business problems, and linking requirements to business objectives in order to solve business problems and set project scope.

The course will outline what processes are and provide practical applications for each step in process mapping. The course will cover the complete cycle of business process mapping and how these processes link business objectives, risks, and measures of success to the process being mapped. The course will cover the complete cycle of business process modeling and how these processes link business objectives, risks, and measures of success to the process being modeled. This course will examine current trends in project management.

Cost analysis and time structures will be examined to review issues that arise during project planning and implementation. The course will identify tools such as Gantt and PERT charts that will illustrate methods used to implement and successfully complete technology projects. Capstone projects are due at the end of the course. This course is designed as the entry point to learning SAS programming, analytics programming concepts and environments. It provides the tools necessary to write SAS programs to perform data management, analysis, and reporting.

The objective of this course is to provide the skills necessary to create and document data sets, manage and reshape data, write simple reports, and compute basic statistics on data set variables. Hands-on exercises designed to facilitate understanding of all the topics are included.

The course also provides the basis for more advanced work in data analytics and advanced programming techniques for data management. This course offers an in-depth exploration of all the major topics in the field of data and information management from an applied perspective. The course is designed to provide not only a strong theoretical foundation, but also the technical skills required in analyzing, designing, implementing, managing, and utilizing information repositories.

Topics covered include relational database model, data modeling, logical and physical database design, structured query language SQL implementation, procedures and triggers, data integration and quality, data warehouses and database administration. This course explores data and information management related issues in the context of business organizations; therefore, strategic roles that data and information play in business operations, customer relationship management, business decision-making, and strategy development are also discussed.

This course introduces an analytical toolset to address modern, data-intensive business problems. The course provides an overview of the key concepts, applications, processes and techniques relevant to business analytics.

The course makes use of SAS Enterprise Miner to illustrate the use of business analytics methodologies to enhance business decision-making. As business organizations collect more and more data as a byproduct of their operations, decision-makers are beginning to proactively and systematically analyze these data to improve decision quality.

This course focuses on the two key processes of business analytics: The course provides an in-depth discussion on the modeling, design and implementation of data warehouses and other relevant techniques for addressing big data issues in organizations today. Data mining is the process that uses a variety of data analysis tools to discover patterns and relationships in data that may be used to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions. The course provides an in-depth discussion on various techniques of data mining including predictive modeling, pattern recognition, prescriptive analytics, and text mining.

Both the theoretical and practical aspects of data warehousing and mining are discussed in this course. This course is designed to provide a foundation of SAS analytics programming concepts and environments. Topics include creating and documenting data sets, managing and reshaping data, writing reports, computing statistics on data set variables, and performing effective SAS programming.

MA or equivalent. This course offers an in-depth exploration of all the major topics in the field of data and information management from an applied perspective with an emphasis on data warehouses. Topics covered include relational database model, data modeling, logical and physical database design, structured query language SQL implementation, procedures and triggers, data integration and quality, data warehouses and other relevant techniques for addressing big data issues in organizations today.

The strategic roles that data and information play in business operations, customer relationship management, business decision-making, and strategy development are also discussed. This course provides an analytical toolset to address modern, data-intensive business problems. To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analytics professional needs to be able to use analytical tools to translate information into decisions and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts.

Using a case-based approach, the course provides an overview of the key concepts, applications, processes and techniques relevant to business analytics. The course makes use of the leading software products to illustrate the use of business analytics methodologies to enhance business decision-making. This course focuses on topics relevant to data mining, which is the process that uses a variety of data analysis tools to discover patterns and relationships in data that may be used to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions.

Both the theoretical and practical aspects of data mining are discussed in this course. This course examines the use of health information technology HIT in healthcare organizations.

This course examines basic healthcare operations management functions and applicability within a variety of organizations. Specific competencies necessary for effectively managing the business operations area of healthcare organizations are addressed. This course focuses upon the importance of recruiting, selecting and retaining qualified healthcare professionals. Various models, concepts, and case studies relevant to employment practices and issues within healthcare are presented.

The integral role Human Resources play in healthcare organizations is emphasized. The focus of this course is on the consumption of healthcare research and the application of evidence-based practice for healthcare managers. This course introduces types of research methodologies, data collection, analysis of data, and the interpretation and application of best practices for organizations. This course provides a thorough examination of the principles and concepts of marketing as applied to healthcare organizations and healthcare services.

Topics include an overview of the marketing process, consumer behavior, branding and the application of market research and analysis. The practices of product strategies, product pricing, and customer service, as essentials in healthcare, are emphasized.

This course introduces financial management vocabulary, concepts, and accounting principles necessary for effective resource utilization required within healthcare roles. Operating and capital budgets, chart of accounts, and responsibility reports are explored. Practical application will include using healthcare information to prepare a capital and operational budget.

This course explores the complex legal system and emerging issues of healthcare regulation. Course discussion includes healthcare regulatory compliance and legal and ethical situations that directly apply to the healthcare environment. Practical application will include preparation of a Code of Ethics to emphasize the potential for unethical and illegal situations within healthcare.

This course discusses management principles and practice within healthcare organizations. Topics include basic principles related to motivating employees, performance management, and communication.

Practical application will include critiquing current managerial practices in a variety of healthcare organizations. This BHMC program culminates with the capstone project where a major healthcare management topic relative to a specific organization is explored and completed. The practical application will synthesize prior course information and sharpen research skills throughout the capstone project. This course introduces core concepts of biology, including: This course provides a general foundation in biological science necessary for further study in the life sciences and allied health fields.

It also serves to introduce the nonscientist to major areas of interest in the biological sciences. Topics include scientific method, cell structure, function and metabolism, introductory genetics, and ecology. A laboratory component supports the lecture material and allows students to perform simple experiments. The incidence of malnutrition during the course of cancer ranges from 30 to 90 percent and varies according to the type, location, grade and stage of tumor, tumor spread, anticancer treatments, and individual susceptibilities Nitenberg and Raynard, ; Capra, Ferguson and Reid, Weight loss and malnutrition are associated with delayed healing, treatment alterations, increased risk of complications and death, and impaired quality of life Ottery, ; compromised immune function Gogos, Ginopoulos and Salsa, ; longer hospitalizations Ottery, ; Bauer, Capra and Ferguson, ; and readmission within 30 days of discharge Bauer, Capra and Ferguson, Also significant is the role of nutrition in cancer survivorship.

As more people surviving cancer endeavor to prevent cancer recurrence and second primary tumors, demand for nutritional guidance will increase Brown et al, Although scientific evidence is not sufficient to provide firm guidelines for cancer survivors at present, oncology dietitians assist clients in making informed choices based on the current scientific information.

These records are part of the official record maintained by the health care facility. Code of Ethics — Dietitians of Canada. Oncology dietitians effectively apply, participate in or generate research to enhance practice.

The American Dietetic Association standards of professional practice for dietetics professionals. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 98 1 , The gerontological nutritionists standards of professional practice for dietetics professionals working with older adults.

Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 99 7 , American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Standards of practice for nutrition support dietitians. Nutrition in Clinical Practice, 15, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 7 , Use of the scored patient-generated subjective global assessment as a nutrition assessment tool in patients with cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56 8 , Nutrition during and after cancer treatment: A guide for informed choices by cancer survivors.

CA Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 51 3 , Canadian Association for Psychosocial Oncology. Standards of psychosocial oncology services in Canada: Professional standards for dietitians in Canada. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids plus vitamin E restore immunodeficiency and prolong survival for severely ill patients with generalized malignancy.

Students study database concepts and the Access environment and learn how to design and create databases. This self-study comprehensive course covers all the functions and features of Excel for students of any skill level. It is an overview of the field of culinary arts and is designed to provide a snapshot of the fundamentals of the culinary profession as well as background on the theories that apply to the use of ingredients and preparation of foods.

It focuses on the knowledge and skills a chef needs to operate and manage a food service operation and to prepare a variety of foods. The course also explores management areas such as food safety, sanitation, menu creation, recipe conversion, inventory and cost control. This exam introduces students to all the necessary techniques to successfully bake quick breads, muffins, yeast breads, cakes, cupcakes, brownies and other baked goods.

It is an overview of the field of baking and pastry arts and is designed to introduce students to the basics of using ingredients to create baked goods for consumption both personally and professionally. The knowledge and skills necessary to operate a bakery are discussed. This exam serves as an introduction to assessment in early childhood settings. Various means of assessment i.

Additionally, students explore how to evaluate assessment data for instructional decision-making. Exam content reflects contemporary theory and practice and promotes ideas and skills that tap children's propensity for creativity and critical thinking. Numerous strategies of arts integration and examples of learning content through the visual arts, music, dance, and poetry are discussed. This exam explores early childhood organizational plans, procedures, physical facilities and surveys appropriate materials and equipment.

Emphasis is placed on the process of designing appropriate learning environments for young children and an integrated, developmental approach to curriculum and instruction in the early childhood education. The exam covers all aspects of classroom life, the roles of children and adults in education, the physical and social environments, and the multiple developmental domains for children in early childhood education and provides a collaborative approach to curriculum development in early childhood education.

This exam provides the guidelines for creating effective partnerships with families. It provides an overview of the diversity of modern families.

The emphasis is on examining elements that create successful partnerships and programs that work. Best practices suggest that when communities, schools, and families work together, the results are stronger communities that support the success of young people. The challenges that schools face today in fostering true parental engagement are the result of a multitude of complex issues. In completion of this course, students will have completed an in-depth study of ways schools are successfully meeting the parent-school connection challenge.

Students also explore and adapt strategies to create that connection in ways that meet the specific needs of various schools and communities.

Foundations of American Education is a graduate-level course providing a broad study of the philosophical and social foundations of education in the United States. Students become proficient in terminologies, educational theories, practice and legislation relevant to the American educational system. Students link previously developed educational ideas to present practices and compare and contrast the benefits and deficiencies of the applications of these ideas.

After being exposed to this information, students should be able to implement these theories into practice. In addition to taking a final examination on the course content, students are required to write two research papers on assigned topics and must successfully complete both of these assignments in order to receive credit recommendations. This exam explores the many aspects of the profession of early childhood education, focusing on developmentally appropriate practices, types of programs, historical perspectives, ethics, current issues, and what it means to be a professional.

The purpose of this exam is to enable new and veteran teachers to construct the knowledge, basic competencies, and dispositions needed to the reading and writing abilities of students in grades Pre-K to 8. This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of American Literature from World War II to contemporary times. Class discussions focus on nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches, and short stories and their relevance to respective historical time periods.

Students are responsible for reading required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance their literary education.

This self-study course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of years of American Literature from Early America to World War II. Students are responsible for required works and choose supplemental readings in a genre of their choice to enhance and inform their literary education. This exam is about determining whether an argument is sound using logical principles and teaches students to commit logical arguments to paper and to evaluate written arguments.

Students use various types of reasoning, including inductive, deductive and analogical reasoning so they are better equipped to make determinations as to the validity of an argument. Additionally, students continue to develop standard composition skills, including: This self-study course requires students to complete approximately six reading assignments and pass a final exam.

This self-study course provides an overview of public speaking techniques, goals, and procedures. The course begins with a discussion of presentation of speeches in general and ways to encourage maximum audience attentiveness. Students are required to deliver four oral speeches of varying lengths on assigned topics as described in the course syllabus and successfully pass a final examination to earn credit recommendations for this course.

It provides students with an extensive background in athletic training and acute and emergency care as a profession. Students who are majoring in athletic training will find in this essential background on which to build their complete education. Anatomy and Physiology SCI or equivalent. The study covers a variety of physiological disorders and diseases that require special exercise considerations.

The course first covers an introduction to clinical exercise and general skills such as examination and interview skills as well as exercise testing and prescribing. The course then shifts to a discussion of individual diseases and their related exercises. Endocrinology and metabolic disorders are discussed, followed by cardiovascular diseases. The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and exercises as a part of treatment are discussed and applied for each disease.

The scope of each disease is also described. The final examination will ask students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials. The course first covers respiratory diseases and the exercises which patients can perform to maintain or gain back their health, then shifts to a discussion of immune related diseases such as cancer.

Clinical considerations, pathophysiology, and exercise training are described. The course also discusses disorders of bone and joints, as well as select neuromuscular disorders.

Finally, the course discusses special populations, including children, older adults, people with clinical depression, and people with intellectual disabilities. Within each topic, clinical considerations are factored in and the exercise training is described. The final examination asks students to read a series of case studies and respond to questions on each one in paragraph form in order to demonstrate mastery of the materials.

This course is designed to introduce the structures of human anatomy and explain how these structures are involved in human movement. Numerous illustrations and optional opportunities for are provided to enhance the learning of human anatomy.

This is a science-based course covering background, theory, and research in the field of physical growth and motor behavior across the life span, as well as the practical application of these concepts.

The course begins with an introduction to changes in the body, from neurological to physiological and discusses what factors affect these changes. The course then focuses on motor control and development through every life stage. Sociocultural influences are described. Students learn how to assess these changes and understand their importance as a factor of human growth.

This is a course for students with no prior background in the subject. The course begins with a background description of the field and continues with the history of the profession, then shifts to the actual role of the health education professional. Focus is placed on the ethics, responsibilities, and required certifications one is required to have in the field. Students also learn about theories and planning models of health promotion.

Additionally, the course teaches the setting for health education and promotion, as well as the agencies involved. Finally, the course covers the future of this growing field. This self-study course is designed to provide students with a broad survey of the important issues in the study of comparative politics.

Students will gain an understanding of world politics and political systems and compare issues and structures on a global level. Students conduct in-depth studies of individual countries focusing on theoretical frameworks to explore broad issues such as why some countries modernize more quickly and why some are more democratic and understand how local issues have a worldwide impact.

Students also explore how politics works on individual, group, national, and global levels. Throughout the course, students study political institutions and processes and learn to use critical thinking skills regarding the consequences of public policies.

Students observe the international economy and how politics shape a nation's influence on the local and global levels. Additionally, students learn about other countries, regions, and the world while asking fundamental questions about politics and government.

This self-study course follows the Jewish immigration and settlement in the United States and covers the Jewish experience of Jewish immigrants, coming primarily from Eastern Europe and settling in the United States.

Jewish Art of Antiquity examines visual Judaism from the time of the settlement of the Jewish people in the Land of Israel, including major emphasis on Late Antiquity. This includes knowledge of the major archaeological finds from that period in both Israel and the Diaspora, and what makes each significant.

The exam presents a variety of interpretations of these pieces and analyzes the debates over various theories of interpretation. Social, political, and religious contexts are examined to better understand the meaning of the art. Comparisons are made between different works from the period. Special attention is given to the rabbinic view on art and specific types of art, and what level of influence the rabbis may have had over the producers of the art in this period.

It also covers the history of synagogue music for prayer and cantillation of the Bible and traces the development of the art of chazzanus and the folk song. Numerous Jewish cultures, both Ashkenazic and Sephardic will be discussed.

Students discover how Jewish music developed in different circumstances and ultimately examine how the music of the Orthodox community became what it is today. The exam surveys many of the tools in the mathematical toolbox, including concepts in data sets, number systems, algebra, geometry, logic, graphing, probability and statistics.

At each stage, students are expected to apply these tools to analytically solve problems. Familiarity with the basics of arithmetic, algebra and geometry is assumed, though the relevant concepts are reviewed where appropriate.

Search Google Appliance